FLUIDS

How much and what? We have already written a lot about this, but everyone has specific questions. This is the place to ask them.

70 Responses to “FLUIDS”

  1. lesley

    Is lime juice a good substiute for lemon juice to get more citrate?

    Reply
  2. Rebecca Ramey

    Do you need someone else as a study I’m willing. I need help

    Reply
    • Fredric Coe, MD

      Hi Rebecca, I do not believe we need anyone right now. But if you need help perhaps you could say what it is you need and I might try to point you in the right direction. Regards, Fred Coe

      Reply
  3. Jason

    What about coconut water? Is it high/low in oxalate?

    Reply
    • jharris

      Hi Jason,
      Although avocados are listed as “high” you can certainly safely incorporate them in your diet. Look at the milligrams, not the adjective describing it. 19 mg for a whole avocado is not high.
      Best, Jill

      Reply
    • jharris

      Hi Jason,
      You can have it.
      Best, Jill

      Reply
  4. Melissa Howard

    Dr. Coe and Jill Harris,
    I’ve been drinking approx. one liter of Crystal Light every day for the last 6 mos to raise the citrate level in my urine. I’ll be going over my recent 24 hr urine results with my urologist next month. In the meantime, is there anything comparable citrate-wise to Crystal Light I can continue to include in my fluids that doesn’t have artificial sweetener as an ingredient? How much pure lemon juice would I need to add to my water to get the same amt of citrate? Thank you.

    Reply
    • Fredric Coe, MD

      Hi Melissa, Actually I have a good thought for you. If you eat the 5 servings of fruits and veggies that is in the kidney stone diet and also recommended for all Americans, you will get 110 mEq of potassium anion, which should make quite a difference and may even make potassium citrate tablets unnecessary. In general the kidney stone diet is the foundation of all treatment, and for reasons like this. Regards, Fred Coe

      Reply
  5. Earline

    I read on another’s list that Ovaltine is rated High Oxalate but it doesn’t give the Mg amount. They only include it in the category shown as High Oxalate. I don’t find Ovaltine on the list you recommend. Can you provide me with the High Oxalate for Ovaltine?

    Reply
    • Fredric Coe, MD

      Hi Earline, I expect Jill Harris will want to answer this one. Regards, Fred Coe

      Reply
    • jill harris

      Hi Earline,
      I don’t have reputable numbers on Ovaltine, but I do suspect it would have higher oxalate bc of the cocoa powder it contains. I would have it as a treat, once a week, and leave it at that.
      Be well,
      Jill

      Reply
  6. Carl Hammel

    I posted a question about a week ago in the Foods section and, seeing no answer, thought that perhaps it was because I had posted it in the wrong section, as it involved a fluid.
    My question was: are the benefits of cranberry juice to overall kidney/bladder health an old wive’s tale or is there value in a glass or more of cranberry juice per day?
    FYI – had my second stone in 5 years a few weeks ago; did not find the stone, but did find the previous one and it was 80% calcium oxalate monohydrate, 10% uric acid and 10% calcium oxalate dihydrate.

    Reply
  7. Jan Young

    Dr. Coe: Is your practice only to prevent and treat kidney stones? I have Chronic Kidney Disease with a history of two kidney stones. My last stone was about one and a half years ago. I am a female who is 67 years old. I want to do everything to prevent the kidney disease from getting worse. Would it be possible to make an appointment to see you? Thank you for your response.

    Reply
    • Fredric Coe, MD

      Hi Jan, My main purposes are stone prevention, but stones can lead to kidney disease so one has to do more than just one thing. I am easy to get to – my secretary is Kathleen Dineen 773 702 1475. Regards, Fred Coe

      Reply
  8. Ben Silverwater

    I’m in my sixties and new to kidney stones (oxalate). How does one handle the increased need to urinate when out of the house with the consumption of one half to a gallon of water a day?

    Reply
    • jharris

      Hi Ben,

      I am not going to lie. It can be cumbersome to say the least. But kidney stones are worse, no? The goal is to do this most of the time. Understandably, some days might be tough if you are out all day. Do your best, perhaps you don’t need to drink as much as you think. Drink as much as you need to produce at least 2.5 liters of urine a day. This will help lessen your stone risk.

      Thanks for writing- Jill

      Reply
  9. Diego

    Just came from my appointment to go over the Litholink study results and everything looks great except for my urine calcium. Normal serum calcium, very high Uribe calcium (670). Waiting for Parathyroid Hornone Test. Hoping to get some feedback on what can I do in the meantime to improve my situation. Just increase urine output? What about dietary calcium intake? Should it be restricted? Also, can you offer any information on this normal serum calcium – high urine calcium result? I can’t quite understand how that’s possible. Thank you so much for this terrific website. This is by far the most complete resource on the internet for kidney stones.

    Reply
  10. Elizabeth

    I have had kidney stones for about 3 weeks. Also I had my gut bacteria analyzed by Ubiome and got the report about 2 weeks ago. There is a bacteria that helps prevent formation of kidney stones (oxalobacter formigenes) which I am very very low in. This bacteria produces an enzyme (Oxalyl-CoA decarboxylase) which helps dissolve oxalate which is one of the primary substances in kidney stones. I have searched the web and out of many probiotics and enzymes I have looked at, none contain these items. Can anyone direct me to a place where I can buy either of these two substances, preferably the bacteria.

    Reply

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