FOODS

Many of you will leave your doctor’s office with questions about foods and kidney stone prevention. You will go home. You will sit down at your desk and the Googling will begin. Here is a spot for you to ask me anything you like about this topic. We already have things on this site about salt, oxalate, and calcium but this space is for specific issues for anyone who comes.

233 Responses to “FOODS”

  1. Erik

    Hello,

    I have a history of kidney stones. A couple of questions came up while looking at the Harvard list of oxalate content in foods, but I didn’t see a way to ask questions there and I’m hoping you can help.

    First is about beans – I eat a lot of black beans and pinto beans, as indicated for my blood type, but neither made the Harvard list. Should I assume all beans are high in oxalate, or do you have access to specific information about those varieties? Secondly, does the oxalate content of nuts change with cooking/baking them? I’m primarily wondering about almonds, which I eat regularly.

    Thank you,

    Erik

    Reply
    • Fredric L Coe, MD

      Hi Erik, So sorry your comment got buried by a page change!! Beans are not much of an oxalate load. As for nuts, oxalate is impervious to baking, so unless you boil them to elute out the oxalate it will be there. ALmonds toasted are almonds. Regards, and apologies, Fred Coe

      Reply
  2. pamela

    Hi Dr Coe. I hope you and your family are well.

    I am trying to compile a list of high potassium, low oxalate foods. I am especially interested in breakfast foods, but frankly ANY assistance in this area would be helpful.

    Thanks so much.

    Reply
    • jharris

      Hi Pamela,
      You can get your potassium needs met by getting your share of low oxalate fruits and veggies. Check out the safe oxalate list I put together from the original Harvard list to show patients that there is plenty to eat.
      Best, Jill

      Reply
  3. Kim Wills

    Hello – After being diagnosed with kidney stones and with a urine oxalate score of 128 (my dr said he has never seen such a high score) I was told to go online to reduce foods with high oxalate which led me here. I am already on a very limited diet for inflammation that I started in September which took out dairy, grains, beans, and sugar so what I was left with is a lot of foods apparently high in oxalate. I found the Harvard list and your safe list but just wondering why for instance on the Harvard list avocado is listed as very high oxalate value but on the safe list (as with some other foods like sweet potatoes) – is not all oxalate the same? Is that why some foods that are considered high on the Harvard list are still ok to eat? Thank you for your reply!

    Reply
    • jharris

      Hi Kim,
      Please read the article that goes with the safe list. It explains why I made the safe list and how the original Harvard list can be confusing for patients because of the descriptors. Avocado is listed as “high” on the original list but it is on the “safe” list because if you are allowed to eat 100 mg/ox per day then 19mg of oxalate for a whole avocado is certainly within your daily limits. Getting your calcium needs met is even more important than the oxalate portion of this diet. I have seen many patients with your high oxalate level and it can be easily gotten down to lower than 30 when you implement all the aspects of the kidney stone diet.
      Best, Jill

      Reply
      • Kim Wills

        Thank you, that makes sense now. I didn’t get the 100 mg per day part. I missed reading that somehow. I will go back and re-read. I think I will keep a journal so I know I am staying within the 100 mark per day. With a score so high do I need to be below 100 or is 100 still ok? Thank you for your encouragement that you have had patients bring their levels down with these diet changes. I felt very discouraged after my call with the dr today. Especially, because I am already on such a limited diet with my inflammation issues, I didn’t know what else to eat. Thank you so much for providing this information for people! It is a blessing!

        Reply
        • jharris

          Hi Kim,
          Think about taking my online course. It has helped many patients understand how to implement the Kidney Stone Diet. Right now I have temporarily slashed the price to help during the Covid-19 virus. kidneystonediet.com/course
          If your doc has not advised otherwise, 100mg/oxalate should be fine, but remember. Getting your calcium is KEY in lowering oxalate-
          Best, Jill

          Reply
        • jharris

          Hi Kim,
          I understand how overwhelming and frustrating this all can be. Esp when you have other dietary restrictions. Getting your daily calcium is very important. Stay under 100. Most of my patients have no problem doing that.
          Best, Jill

          Reply
  4. Paul Chalfant

    Is Kidney COP Calcium Oxalate Protector effective?

    Reply
    • jharris

      Hi Paul,
      Look at the label. It doesn’t save you from dietary changes, as it says you still must do that. It can be helpful if you have lower citrate. If not, not helpful to you. Doing a urine collection will let you know. Read this on potions and pills-https://kidneystonediet.com/kidney-stone-supplements-potions-and-pills/
      Best, Jill

      Reply
  5. Joe Griscti

    My special needs son has to be put on a low oxalate diet. He has Tuberous Sclerosis and some renal stone issues. He can only eat pureed food. I see conflicting designations for the following three vegetables. Can you clarify if low, medium or high oxalate for these three foods? (1) Pumpkin (already pureed-used for filling in a pumpkin pie). (2) Sliced white potatoes in a can (which will be pureed). (3) Baby food squash (orange color) in a jar. Thank you.

    Reply
    • jharris

      Hi Joe,
      Harvard did not study these three particular foods that you inquire about. Other sources have said that pumpkin is on the lower side. I would assume that the potatoes are high and the squash would be ok. My patients eat both pumpkin and squash and do lower their oxalate levels, but more importantly, they are also getting their recommended calcium requirement met each day.
      Best, Jill

      Reply
  6. Paul Chalfant

    I live in south-central Pennsylvania. Are there any doctors or urologists in my area that use your approach to kidney stones? Or is it possible to see a physician at your location?
    I’m very intrigued by the use of potassium citrate. I spoke to my primary care physician about it and she didn’t have a lot of information about it.

    Reply
    • Fredric L Coe

      Hi Paul, U Penn in Philadelphia is a good place and your best bet. Regards, Fred

      Reply
  7. DEBBIE A BENNETT

    Do you have a newsletter or any other info that you send by email? I would like to be on your mailing list for what to what to eat and avoid if I am told that I need to avoid oxalates. I am exhausted trying to do research!! Doctors in Bakersfield are NO help and are over worked and dont seem to care. Thank you! 661 330 9390 debbieb0709@att.net

    Reply
    • jharris

      Hi Debbie,
      We both send newsletters. You can sign up at the homepage of this site and I have a site too that you will find helpful here: kidneystonediet.com
      Best, Jill

      Reply
  8. Liz Docherty

    My stone composition is a mixture of calcium phosphate and calcium oxalate monohydrrate what is best supplyment to take.

    Reply
  9. Bob

    Jill, I also have Diabetes Type 2. Friends have told me that I should try Juice 2 Pills to help combat Diabetes. Do you know anything about these pills and whether they ‘d have an impact on Oxolate and sodium intake?

    Thanks

    Reply
    • jharris

      Hi Bob,
      I am not a fan of pills of any sort when you can be eating wonderful fruits and veggies. Fruits that are high in fiber so as to control blood sugar are better than fruits without fiber, like grapes. I do not know the oxalate level of those pills and the sodium would be listed on the label I would think. The extra nutrients and fiber you get from food are much better for you and your Type 2 diabetes!
      Thanks for writing, Jill

      Reply
  10. Peggy M Cheek

    1. In the food list it has Olive Oil & Vinegar but no serving size. Can you give that?

    2.Stevia Sweetner 1 tsp Very High 42 mg. Is this the only sweetener to be concerned with? Does Monk Fruit sweetener go in the Artificial Sweetener 1 packet, very low 1 mg ?

    3. I thought I was doing great with not having any stone issues in 4 years..But to my dismay, I have two large and numerous ones in each kidney. I am having laser treatment on Tuesday to get the one stuck in my tube and if possible, hit the large one behind it. If that cant be accomplished, the lithotripsy yet again! Can you make a special diet for me? I need No oxylates to under 50 a day, Keto friendly and careful with the Vitamin K due to Factor V (not on blood thinner)? Thank you for your time.

    Reply
    • Adrienne

      Waiting to hear if someone can help. I think Peggy and I were separated at birth. I have Leidens factor V (although now on low dose Eliquis– way better than Coumadin, Keto for 2 years.

      Reply

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