FOODS

Many of you will leave your doctor’s office with questions about foods and kidney stone prevention. You will go home. You will sit down at your desk and the Googling will begin. Here is a spot for you to ask me anything you like about this topic. We already have things on this site about salt, oxalate, and calcium but this space is for specific issues for anyone who comes.

274 Responses to “FOODS”

  1. Krista

    I’m a 33-year-old female recently diagnosed with my first kidney stone (2 mm, no pain – it’s still in my kidney). I suspect this was caused by not staying hydrated, as well as possibly following a keto diet for the past few months. Since my diagnosis I have cut out regular coffee, drink 10-12 glasses of water daily, limit sodium to 1500mg or less, watch my animal protein intake, and avoid high-oxalate foods or pair them with dairy. Is there a way I can safely continue the keto diet (or at least for another 4-6 months)? If so, what should my daily protein intake be? I’m 5’1 and 145lbs and I’d like to lose 15-20 lbs.

    Thank you for the wealth of information on this website – It’s very helpful!

    Krista

    Reply
    • Fredric L Coe, MD

      Hi Krista, you pose a difficult issue. Given a stone and a desire to continue on an extreme diet, if you were my responsibility I would recommend 24 hour urine testing to determine what stone forming risks were present, and try to offset them despite the diet. Perhaps your physicians might want to try this as a way to mitigate risk of more stones. Regards, Fred Coe

      Reply
  2. John Hacker

    Thanks for the help, age 74, weight 235, 5’8, uric acid in blood mnormal. Stone was 80% uric 20% calcium. Doctors are VA Miami. i was taking Himalaya Boswellia for shoulder pain and movement. Please tell me i can start taking it again. VA Docs say its high in oxalate, Google won’t confirm.
    Sincerely,
    John

    Reply
    • Fredric L Coe, MD

      Hi John, Your main stone component is uric acid, not calcium oxalate, and uric acid forms when urine is too acid. Older age lowers urine pH – complex matter – and potassium citrate 10 mEq 2 tabs three times a day will raise urine pH and end your stone problem. Feel free to get the 60 mEq of alkali in any othr way you wish – Crystal light lemonade gives 20 mEq/liter, and there are a lot of OTC products but with much lower amounts of alkali per pill. The calcium oxalate crystals are probably being fostered by uric acid crystals and may well not come back. As for the stuff for your shoulder, I see no relation to stones. Regards, Fred Coe

      Reply
  3. Al

    What is a high calcium plant based food to take at meal times to bind with the food’s oxalate and reduce the occurrence of CaOx stones?

    Reply
    • Fredric L Coe, MD

      Hi Al, the most reliable diet calcium sources are milk and other dairy products. Plants with a lot of calcium often have a lot of oxalate. Regards, Fred Coe

      Reply
  4. Marianna Northrup

    Can you explain why cornmeal is high in oxalates and corn flour is not? Corn flour is cornmeal that is ground much finer. If anything, corn flour would contain more corn per volume and, therefore, be higher in oxalates.

    Reply
    • jharris

      Hi Marianna,
      It is the concentration of the product that makes the difference.
      Jill

      Reply
  5. Danielle Rose

    I am lost in this sea of information!!!! I am an oxilate kidney stone producer and lately my diet has been on a huge overhaul which makes getting enough food based calcium tricky…..Is there a particular calcium supplement that you recommend to increase my calcium intake? I am already taking indapamide with potassium and would love to add an appropriate calcium supplement to ensure I am getting enough.

    Reply
  6. Mark

    This site is a great resource. I’m 39 male and just passed a stone. I don’t ever want to do that again so trying to take some steps to change diet… likely cause was a previous diet of spinach and nuts, everyday and in large quantities, and very little water.

    I’m struggling to find protein for muscle building (I need to eat like 170-200g per day) on a low oxalate diet. Can you comment on the following:

    Steel cut oatmeal with yougurt (I saw your previous post, so this seems ok)
    Red lentil pasta (some sites say no lentils, others say ok if boiled (pasta is boiled), others say red but not white) – pls help!
    Whey protein powder (~50g per day) – I’d mix with milk (no longer almond milk) and strawberry/bananas.

    Thank you!

    Reply
  7. Karen

    Hello. I am currently trying to follow 3 diets simultaneously. I have Celiac’s disease, Barrett’s Esophagus and now I have kidney stones. So my gluten free diet kept me at a healthy weight and I don’t eat anything that may cause reflux. My menu is already quite limited and now many of my staples cause stones. I make most of my meals from scratch so I know exactly what I’m ingesting. I make banana oat muffins with a few chocolate chips every week. I put in peanut butter, milk, applesauce and an egg. They have been my go-to for so long and it’s about the only I enjoy each day. I usually laugh and say I eat to survive and not enjoyment. I’m very unclear if gf whole grain oats are high in oxalates because your list says oatmeal is low but that whole grains are moderate to high. Can you clarify so I can continue to enjoy my breakfasts without worrying? Thanks

    Reply
    • jharris

      Hi Karen,
      I help many patients put all their different diets together. It can be very daunting. I find that they limit themselves too much on the oxalate part. Come to my site for all kinds of free stuff that could help you: kidneystonediet.com/help
      jill

      Reply
  8. Tashia King

    Hello everyone.
    I’ve recently been diagnosed with a kidney stone. The issue I’m having is that the type of kidney stone I have(or had if it’s passed) is unknown. I’ve definitively been that person sitting in front of my computer searching every website and post I could find regarding foods and kidney stones. Which foods to eat? Which foods to stay away from? I’m confused because there’s so much conflicting information as to what the do’s and don’ts are. It’s twice as confusing for me, because I have no idea which type of stone I have. Do you have any advice on a “general” diet, which is beneficial, and safe for “all” types of stones?

    Reply

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