FOODS

Many of you will leave your doctor’s office with questions about foods and kidney stone prevention. You will go home. You will sit down at your desk and the Googling will begin. Here is a spot for you to ask me anything you like about this topic. We already have things on this site about salt, oxalate, and calcium but this space is for specific issues for anyone who comes.

128 Responses to “FOODS”

  1. Gail Shorr

    I have question about being on a low oxalate diet and a Gluten free (or Gluten reduced diet).
    Many of the flours used in GF baking are made with brown rice flour (high oxalate) or white rice flour (moderate oxalate).
    Do you have articles, references, or advice how to combine both diets?
    Thank you

    Reply
  2. Daniela D. Daniel

    I am a new kidney stone patient who is trying to maneuver this world on my own. I have seen a urologist and done the 24 hour collection but was sent away with vague instructions. I will see a new doctor once I pay down some medical bills from the trip to the ER but for now, I have two main question…my treatment plan based on the urine analysis was to 1) increase fluids 2) start K-cit 15 for low citrate (454) and high pH (6.484) and 3) reduce animal protein. I am finding mixed information on whether milk and yogurt are considered “animal protein” and am also wondering if I HAVE to take pills, they are expensive! Would lemon water suffice? Desperately wondering. Thank you so much.

    Reply
  3. Ann Avila

    Thank you for this website. I am learning so much. However, I do have a couple of questions. I haven’t seen much about oatmeal or steel oats…are either of these low in oxalate? Also, I am very confused after reading your lists as to what flours are low in oxalate? I find they conflict and am frustrated when grocery shopping. Occasionally, I would like to to have a sandwich. Is there a bread made with the correct flour and/or do you have a recipe to make a sandwich bread?

    Reply
    • jharris

      Hi Ann,
      Make sure you download the oxalate list we use here from Harvard. They list the foods you are asking about. You can certainly have a sandwich, pair it with some calcium and you are fine.
      Be well,
      Jill

      Reply
  4. Justin Bates

    Hello, thank you for this website, it is an invaluable resource.
    I’d like to clarify the oxalate content of berries and their risk factor for stone formers. Almost every website lists them as a major “no no”. However, the oxalate spreadsheet offered on your website (featured here: https://kidneystones.uchicago.edu/how-to-eat-a-low-oxalate-diet/ ) would indicate they aren’t very high in oxalate at all. I am curious to know – who’s right, and why such a large discrepancy on the topic? Is this a case of old/new studies in contrast, differing mechanisms of testing/metrics, or are their other factors besides oxalate that make berries “dangerous”? Thank you.

    Reply
    • jharris

      Hi Justin,

      Most list agree that raspberries are high. Harvard (the one we use and cite here) says that blackberries and blueberries are lower. I can assure you that one of the reasons we promote and use the Harvard list is because our patients do indeed lower their urinary oxalate when they follow this list and all the advice on how to use the list and eating enough calcium.
      Hope this helps-

      Jill

      Reply
  5. Toni

    Many sources say that Special K Red Berries is a lower oxalate cereal alternative, but I was wondering how some of the newer Special K varieties rate on oxalate (e.g. Blueberry w/lemon clusters, fruit and yogurt, protein-cinnamon brown sugar, nourish-peaches and berries w/yogurt pieces, etc…).
    I’m trying to keep my daily oxalate <100 (or weekly <700 if I have a day when it is too difficult to avoid without significantly increasing my sodium intake-I travel frequently). I also aim to drink 100+ oz of water/day (I'm 5'1, ~130lbs).
    Also, I love the Chobani Greek yogurt flip cups, but the only kinds without chocolate or nuts seem to be the key lime crumble (it does have while chocolate) and peach cobbler flavors. Did you think there is enough calcium in the yogurt to cancel out the oxalate in the varieties that do have chocolate/nuts?
    Thanks in advance for your guidance!

    Reply
    • jharris

      Hi Toni,
      We don’t have recent studies discussing the new cereals. But if you have a normal portion size with milk you should be fine. As far as those yogurts go, they are filled with sugar (the flip ones). Yogurt winds up being as bad as a candy bar in many cases. Can you do a low sugar yogurt like Siggi’s and add your own whole fruit? That would be best.
      Be well,
      Jill

      Reply
  6. Carl Hammel

    I am slowly and carefully making my way through this priceless site. I am 80 yoa, just had my second stone in 5 years (80% oxalate monohydrate, 10% uric acid and 10% calcium oxalate dihydrate). I got the message: proper hydration, avoid totally those food items you have identified as Very High in oxalates and, per my doctor’s suggestion, I take 500 mg of calcium citrate each evening at dinner when I am most likely to ingest food items with oxalates. If I occasionally have something which is high in oxalates, I’ll accompany it with a 6oz glass of milk. My question is, does the advice to drink cranberry juice for general kidney health, which one finds everywhere, an old wive’s tale or is there any validity to it?
    Thank you

    Reply
    • Fredric Coe, MD

      Hi Carl, cranberry juice is not a known benefit and can lower urine pH. Given uric acid in stones your pH is already too low. So, no. I would repeat a 24 hour urine on your new regimen and if the pH is below 5.5 consider additional alkali – perhaps more fruits and veggies. Regards, Fred Coe

      Reply
  7. Melanie Ehrhart

    What a great site! I have been a past patient of Dr. Coe. (many years ago) He diagnosed me with medullary sponge kidney complicated by idiopathic hypercalciuria after 2 episodes of stone formation. I currently take Indapamide 1.25mg along with Vitamin D 1000iu. I am having a problem getting my daily requirement of calcium. Could I take a calcium supplement to help me reach my daily total. I understand this supplement has to be taken with a meal. I am a 64 year old postmenopausal female who has osteoporosis. Once I get this sorted out I will need to work on my sugar intake. I had no idea sugar mattered in stone disease! Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

    Reply
    • Fredric Coe, MD

      Hi Melanie, How nice to hear from an old patient and gather that she has been stone free all these years. Supplements are a mediocre swap for foods, but if you need them use with meals, never alone. Low sugar is wise and also against stones. Hypercalciuria can cause bone disease, incidentally, something I did not understand as fully when you knew me. Proper calcium intake is most critical, and as low a sodium intake as possible. Regards, Fred Coe

      Reply
  8. Lisa

    how many oxalates are in oatmeal?

    Thank you so much for the help. I haven’t been able to find anything on Google to give me an oxalate value

    Reply
  9. Nino

    How much oxolate is in black eye peas

    Reply
    • Fredric Coe, MD

      I will hope Jill will answer this one. Fred Coe

      Reply
    • jharris

      Hi Nino,
      I don’t have a reliable source for this food. When I don’t, I give this advice and it has been without a problem for many years: Eat the food in normal portion sizes and once a week!
      Best,
      Jill

      Reply

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