Video Article: How Stones Form

MeThis is the first of what may become a series of articles done as videos.

The site is now a reasonably complete knowledge base but many of the ideas are hard to get and there is a lack of overview materials that are integrative.

That is what I plan for these video articles to do.

This first one tells about how crystals form and how they form specifically in kidneys to create stones and nephrocalcinosis.

It draws upon many of the articles as a base and pulls them together into one narrative.

It also adds materials not found anywhere else on the site because best presented in a video format.

Please let me know what you think.

Regards, Fred Coe

Further Reading:

Organic Materials that Coat Crystals

Plaque in Kidneys

Plugging

What Stones Are

Nephrocalcinosis

Idiopathic Hypercalciuria – Another review of the nephron

Control of Urine Oxalate – Yet another view of the nephron

 

28 Responses to “Video Article: How Stones Form”

  1. Stephen O'Mara

    Hello Dr. Coe.

    I just wanted to thank you for the interesting and informative video and your review of kidney stone formation and treatment. You have certainly expanded my lay understanding of kidney stones and all they entail. I have Crohn’s disease, diagnosed about 32 years ago, and I only recently became aware that Crohn’s patients are prolific stone producers. This came to my attention after some personal research following the passing of seven stones last year over a period of about four months. I managed to catch the seven I know of using a disposable filter cone. No surprise to you, I’m sure, they were found to be oxalate stones. Under the care of an endocrinologist starting last year, we are addressing this “stone problem” with daily doses of oral potassium chloride along with other lab values that ebb and flow with Crohn’s symptoms. Since I live in Canada, regular visits to the specialist and frequent monitoring of lab results for hematology and general chemistry, make managing all this easier. My Crohn’s and Type II diabetes, combined with various treatment therapies for them, sometimes makes it a challenge to address many serum and chemistry levels outside the norm, but it always helps me to know exactly what is going on and you’ve certainly helped me there.

    Again, thank you.
    Stephen

    Reply
    • Fredric Coe, MD

      Hi Stephen, IN Crohn’s’ disease, urine oxalate is often high and can be lowered with high calcium timed to go with meals. I have not as yet written the article on the disease. But the calcium effect on oxalate is here. I do not have comparable data for bowel disease, but I have lots of experience. It works. Regards, Fred Coe

      Reply
    • Joy McCullers

      really liked your presentation but found the back ground music very annoying

      Reply
      • Fredric Coe, MD

        Hi Joy, Thanks for the constructive criticism. I worry about it, too, and need to edit it out. It was my first venture into the medium. Regards, Fred

        Reply
  2. Solomon Lemma

    Hi Dr. Coe,
    Thank you for taking your time and help us understand the formation of the stones. I have passed four smaller, 3-4mm stones between 1998 and 2016, every 4 years. I pass the stones within 3 days of the attack. However i just had another 6mm stone within 1year and i had to go through painful surgery,(The stone result came back as came back Calcium Oxalate Dihydrate (Weddellite) 65% Carbonate Apatite (Dahllite) 35%) the only life style change i can remember in the last two years are high consumption of mixed nuts and from 5 glass of alcohol per week to no Alcohol at all. All tests came back normal except border line Uric Acid 7.2mg.
    I can not thank you enough for all your assistance
    Solomon

    Reply

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