Web Apps and Smart Bottles

Elaine1bCoeTie4This is an article for all of you to write.

The web is awash in apps for tracking fluid intake, and kidney stone prevention is all about fluids.

Some smart bottles‘ have arrived on the market. They track what you drink and keep the results on your smartphone. Since some of these are kickstarter efforts there is even an article on Slate about them. Some appear to be finished and rather sleek products. We know nothing about them.

There are apps for sodium intake, calcium intake – We think. The field looks thin for calcium apps.

Low sodium and high calcium diets are important in stone prevention.

We even found one app for preventing kidney stones – see if you can find it.

Elaine looked up phone apps for water tracking and easily found a number of them. Fred looked too, and found the same. How can we know which ones are any good except we ask you to tell us. Likewise for sodium, and calcium, and for the rather pricy smart bottles.

Please comment.

Say which apps you use or have used. What did you think of them? How long did you use them. Would you recommend them? LIkewise for smart bottles. Are they worth the price – do they help you?

About 30,000 people come to this site every month. Please share your experiences.

This Article Will Get Longer as We Get Your Opinions and Experiences

Since we know nothing about these apps and devices, we need to learn, from you. So please help.

A number of comments have come in, either posted as comments or by email. For the latter I have entered the comments with only the first name and avoiding any email identifiers. Thank  you, everyone so far, and we will soon compile a table as promised.

The Score as of April 2

A tally of the results to date.

DEVICE

LIKED

DISLIKED

NO APP 22
JUST A JUG 11
MY FITNESS PAL 6 2
SPREADSHEET 1
KIDNEY FUNCTION TRACKER 1
SODIUM TRACKER 1 2
HYDRO COACH 1 1
GULP 1
FIT-BIT 1
WATERLOGGED 1
LOSE IT 1
TOTAL 45 7

 

No app at all wins by 33 of the 52 comments. Of these 22 were just no app the other 11 were just a jug. The former meant none used, no interest.The latter meant jugs of water, one kind or another, stashed about or planned the night before in innumerable combinations.

Each of the other devices had a tiny scatter of love or hate or both as the table shows.

This is not science: Some people were hard to score and I left them out – could not tell if they used anything or not.

Dislike meant either not good or good for a while then discarded. Liked means used, valuable, and in play for a significant time.

There are so many people on this site every month, I hope more stop by and comment.

So far I would not buy stock in special water bottle companies, but might want to try out a line of nice colored water jugs – come to think of it the web is saturated with them!

Regards, Elaine and Fred

78 Responses to “Web Apps and Smart Bottles”

  1. Fredric Coe, MD

    Harvey sent this by email: Thank you for the interesting and important articles and discussions that you have been sending out. I have had 2 Kidney stone attacks in the the last 25 years and none since i became a patient at the kidney stone clinic more than 15 years ago. I know nothing about web apps and smart bottles and because I have not had any stones in so many years I have no interest.

    Reply
  2. Fredric Coe, MD

    Kim sent this by email: I was very curious about people’s responses and would be definitely be interested in people’s suggestions or input

    Reply
  3. Fredric Coe, MD

    By email – Still interested!
    Just don’t have anything to contribute.

    Reply
  4. Fredric Coe, MD

    Robert sent this by email: Don’t know much about “smart” bottles but do swear by a low-tech alternative.
    Never did like water straight.
    Bought a clear plastic water bottle which holds 28 oz of water but also has an insert in which you can place fruit, cinnamon sticks, etc. Mine is by “Young and More.” They even have recipes you can try to jazz up the water. There are many other bottles like this on the market. Works for me.

    Reply
  5. Fredric Coe, MD

    Michele sent this by email: Not interested in web apps. I just had my 5th lithotripsy for a one cm stone and another 9mm stone sitting right next to it. I will have it analyzed but I believe it’s calcium oxalate like the others. I passed some large 3mm fragments along with smaller ones without a stent. Not much pain. Will have a kub done in a few weeks and probably see a nephrologist for 24 hour urine and any help she give. This obviously isn’t my first rodeo and I’ve been dealing with this since I’m in my late 20’s and now mid 50’s. I don’t believe I keep making new stones but they grow from the nidus left from small fragments. I have however, incorporated some good solid lifestyle changes that I read about on your site and others which I’ve never done before. I don’t have a problem with citrate as far as my last 24 hour urine. My issue seems to be with sodium, oxalate and low urine ph. It would seem I’d have a problem with uric acid stones but not the case. I’ve started drinking lemon water daily mixed with crystal light, (not crazy about the aspartame and yellow dye.) Also, gone on a much lower sodium diet, cut out all the protein and nuts and trying to lose weight as I’m diabetic as well. Taking Theralith xr and when checking ph of my urine it has increased from 5 to 6 on urine strip. I already drink about 14 – 16 glasses of water per day. Hoping for the best and any advice is always appreciated. Love your website and got so much info there.

    Reply
  6. Fredric Coe, MD

    Brenda sent this by email: Not interested

    Reply
  7. Fredric Coe, MD

    Francis sent this email: Smart bottles are interesting.

    Reply
  8. Fredric Coe, MD

    I use my fitness pal because you can set your sodium intake and it let’s you know when you’re getting close to your limit. You can also reorganize it for your diet so you get less carbs, more proteins, etc. I personally don’t usually track my water because I drink a lot of water but my fitness pal also let’s you do that.

    Thanks,

    Anne

    Reply
  9. Fredric Coe, MD

    Bob sent this by email: not of interest

    Reply
  10. Fredric Coe, MD

    Bill sent this by email: Fred

    I also use my fitness pal to track my intakes. Seems to work good. I monitor my water intake, the old way, I have 4-6 16 oz bottles of water with me daily and I know I’m good when there empty!!

    Your articles are fantastic and I’m honored to be on your mailing list. Thank you

    Reply

Leave a Reply